Sorrow

December 17, 2014

“The purpose of all of your sorrows is to put you in touch with your own life.  Sorrow is a way of calling, a way that life speaks to you and beckons you back into your own heart.  Sorrow is not trouble as much as it is new perspective, an awakening of sorts, of a part of you that’s slumbered, a new being and a new beginning.  Sorrows are not always grief-ridden, though there is always poignancy in them.  They are the side of joy that we fear even though they are, in fact, inseparable from that joy.  Our sorrows are rich and deep and fulfilling.  They give resonance to places inside us that might otherwise be shallow and unexplored, and they give a kind of meaning to our existence by imbuing life with experience and depth and character.  Sorrow makes joy more joyful, it makes contentment more delicious, and it makes our ambitions and our dreams more purposeful.  It makes us sensitive, it makes us permeable, and it makes us open into the embrace of this world even though that embrace is painful.  We are lucky that we have our sorrows; they are not troubles, they are like bells of pure feeling, ringing through us and leaving us to resonate with the world and all of its facets.  We are capable of understanding things because we are capable of sorrow.  We are capable of living as part and parcel of this world because sorrow is ours just as it is the world’s.  We are human, and sorrow shows us this, and it is the most wonderful thing we could ever learn.  Leave your sorrow in your heart.  Do not seek to expel it or transcend it.  Do not seek to be without it.  It is a calling and it is a blessing.  Leave it, open into it, and let it enrich your very experience of things.  Let it be your way into yourself and your way into your own becoming.  Let it be yours so that you may speak it, and feel it, and be it, and so that it may show you your fullness and the great poignancy of all the parts of you you do not yet love.”

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